Our Studies

The influence of brain organization and postural behavior on progression of back pain symptoms in young adults

Low back pain now causes more disability worldwide than any other condition. Most people experience their first episode of back pain in young adulthood, and many go on to suffer from chronic symptoms across the lifespan. The purpose of this study is to determine if aspects of postural coordination behavior and brain organization are associated with recurrence and progression of back pain symptoms in young adults. The research training and data generated by this project will lead to future work establishing if these and other factors predict which individuals will develop chronic symptoms, and ultimately to rehabilitation interventions targeted at those young adults most at risk of developing chronic low back pain.

 

Have you had back pain? We are looking for volunteers to participate in this research study. You may be eligible to participate if you are aged between 18 and 35 and either have been experiencing episodes of low back pain for at least a year or you have never had significant back pain.

 

Chapman University IRB# 1617H094

Influence of muscle fatigue and psychosocial factors on pressure pain threshold

The perception of pain can be influenced by multiple psychosocial and physical factors. Changes in pain sensitivity (hyperalgesia or hypoalgesia) can be quantified using the pain pressure threshold (PPT). The purpose of this study is to examine how the influence of spinal muscle fatigue and psychosocial factors including disordered sleep, anxiety, depression, central sensitization, and pain catastrophizing play a role in modulating pain.

Are you up for the challenge? We are looking for volunteers to participate in this research study. You may be eligible to participate if you are aged between 18 and 60

 

Chapman University IRB# IRB-19-13

Study2part2.jpg

To participate or find out more...

Please contact us at josmith@chapman.edu

or (714) 744-7924